Archer Wins Patent for Quantum Computing Chip in Japan

Archer says Japan patent represents a significant commercial milestone in the company’s development of its quantum chip, providing access to the high-value Japanese market.

In an important commercial step for the Aussie small cap, Archer Materials (“Archer”, ASX:AXE”) has landed its first quantum computing patent associated to the company’s CQ quantum computing chip technology.

The Japanese Patent (JP Patent) is the first granted patent protecting the CQ chip and represents a significant commercial milestone in the company’s development of the quantum device. The new patent provides Archer access to the high-value Japanese market for the CQ chip and marks the first step in the company’s pursuit to access global markets.

The JP Patent application successfully underwent substantive examination procedures in Japan by the Japan Patent Office, one of the world’s largest patent offices.

Archer CEO Mohammad Choucair said, “Archer’s quantum computing chip IP is now well protected in Japan – a major global economy and centre for technological innovation. The grant of a patent in Japan further validates, and substantially derisks, our unique technology. Archer is one of very few companies in the world with a patent portfolio protecting quantum computing qubit processor technology, and this is strategically significant as we rapidly progress in commercializing the CQ chip.”

The success in the grant of the JP patent streamlines the patent granting process and procedures for the additional six international patent applications in the jurisdictions of Australia, South Korea, Hong Kong, China, Europe and the US.

The Company considers Japan as a critical strategic jurisdiction to protect and commercialize its IP. Japan is a major global economy and ranks amongst the top 5 economies in the world for global competitiveness and GDP.

Matt Swayne
Matt Swayne
Matt Swayne is a contributor at The Quantum Daily. He focuses on breaking news about quantum discoveries and quantum computing. Matt enjoys working on -- and with -- startups and is currently working on a media studies master's degree, specializing in science communication.

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